Author: Kristian Kielmayer , Ágnes Herczeg

Menoire

Menoire

History

The better-known – but no longer official – name of the variety is Medoc or Kékmedoc, while old records even mention it as Cot. This leads to the theory that the variety is French and made its way to Hungary from there. However, the name Cot is synonymous with Malbec, and, outside Hungary, the variety is not registered with similar names nor does it have anything in common with the French Mornen Noire. Thus, the origins of this black variety, with its very characteristic Muscat, aromatic, floral aromatics, are rather unknown. The variety was forced to change its name (like, for example Oportó) as its previous name may have erroneously referred to a geographical location (Medoc, Bordeaux/France). It was thus given the attribute of noir (French for black).

Viticultural characteristics

Its relatively small leaves are wider than they are long, smooth and glossy, with symmetrical, blunt lobes. Its leaves turn red relatively early, while its clusters and thick-skinned berries are small, and its Muscat character is undeniable. It buds and ripens early and is a low yielder.

Where it's grown

The variety is only mentioned in Hungary, where it is grown on a total of 64 hectares. The largest amount by far is found in the Eger wine district, where it most often used as part of the Bikavér blend, to a maximum of a few percent. It is rarely found on its own.

What its wine tastes like

The variety can make easy-drinking red wines with medium body and tannins, dominated by its characteristic Muscat aromatics. Its nose and palate are thus characterised by floral notes of geranium and rose petals accompanied by delicate red berry fruit. Herbal notes of dill and bay leaf are also associated with the variety. It generally forms part of blends, but ‘new wine’ and rosé are also produced.

Menoire grabe bunch and leaf

Wine & food pairing

Menoire is also known by the names of Medoc and Kékmedoc. It is a relatively rare variety, officially grown on around 64 hectares, so rarely encountered. It has especially fragrant, Muscat aromas and soft tannins. It is mostly used in blends, in particular in Bikavér, but it can also be found as new wine and rosé. The wines are light in style, so can be appreciated both on their own or accompanying light dishes and enjoyed all year round. Its soft tannins and perfumed aromas are a great match for beef and more characterful Asian pork dishes, but it also works well with spaghetti Bolognese, pigeon or turkey stuffed with plum, venison or baked camembert with cranberry jam. Choose wines from the latest vintages and consume within a year or two to enjoy their freshness at its best. Always store in a cool place, at a constant temperature, away from direct sunlight and heat, to best preserve its fragile perfume. Serve just below room temperatures at about 14-16°C in a tulip-shaped red wine glass. Ingredients that best match the flavour and texture of wines made from Menoire include carrots, beetroot, aubergines, celeriac, tomatoes, sweet spices, curry, mature cheeses, camembert cheeses, goose, duck, game birds and offal as well as pork, veal and venison dishes.

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